The catcher in the rye baseball mitt. The Catcher in the Rye Symbolism: Interpretation & Analysis 2018-12-23

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The Catcher in the Rye Chapter 5 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

the catcher in the rye baseball mitt

The Museum of Natural History: Holden finds the museum appealing because everything in it stays the same. What does Holden think of Mrs. Allie showed that he had a passion for both athletics and poetry by writing on his glove. The glove is a personification of this. Where does Holden then decide to go? Holden Caulfield, the main character has been revealed in the first person view in a unique narrative of a teenage boy who forms a transition into adulthood.


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Symbolism in The Catcher In The Rye: Essay Example

the catcher in the rye baseball mitt

This is a symbol for searching. Holden suspects that the motive is to impress parents who visit on Sunday and ask their sons what they had to eat for dinner the night before. Maurice and Sunny the hooker knock on the door, demanding more money. Holden feels like committing suicide by jumping out the window, but he wouldn't want people looking at his gory body on the sidewalk. The Ducks in Central Park: Holden wonders where the ducks go in the winter when the pond in Central Park freezes over. Depending on the date of Holden's birthday — and his reliability with numbers — we might make an educated guess as to the time of the action in the novel: apparently, Holden is in California, narrating the novel, sometime around the middle of 1950, probably reporting the events of late 1949.

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The catcher in the rye: Questions from chapters 5

the catcher in the rye baseball mitt

It represents Holden's delightful attraction to unusual qualities, in objects as well as people, that others might miss. Holden was only thirteen when Allie passed away, the loss of his brother affected him greatly. The autho … r has put the reader in the doctor's place. What is he thinking about while lying in bed? Holden finally concludes that he would yell at the thief but not have the courage to hit him. It was how he kept occupied when the field got boring.

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Chapter 5

the catcher in the rye baseball mitt

He used to laugh so hard at something he thought of at the dinner table that he just about fell off his chair. It represents Holden's inability to prevent the loss of innocence in others. He was also the nicest, in lots of ways. The thing that was descriptive about it, though, was that he had poems written all over the fingers and the pocket and everywhere. Holden decides if a book is outstanding based on his like or dislike of the author. As Holden starts to cry, Sunny takes the money from his wallet. He describes Allie as kind, innocent, and the smartest person in his family.

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Catcher In The Rye Allie s Baseball Mitt

the catcher in the rye baseball mitt

Although he knows that Maurice and Sunny threaten him, he persists in arguing with them, even though they only dispute a five dollar charge and he believes that he is in serious danger. He is looking for any sort of answer he can get. Holden believes that writing poetry on the glove is symbolic of Allie being a special person. Holden notices how she blocks the aisle in the place as she drones on about how handsome Holden has become. Because there are a lot of feelings and details that look real and that they would seem that real if they weren´t happening in that precise moment of his life. He's desperate because he feels lonely and doesn't have a lot of friends.

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Why is the baseball mitt important in Catcher in the Rye

the catcher in the rye baseball mitt

Preparatory School Life A literary symbol is something, often an object, that stands for a significant concept or series of ideas. Holden says that even though if he wasn't intelligent it was terrible to carry people's suitcases and wait for a tip. The night Allie died Holden slept in the garage and broke all the garage windows. He seems to be in realization that there are many children like who need attention to their problems … and live normal life. We find out a lot about Holden through his reactions to and thoughts about Jane Gallagher. For Holden, the two schools are emblematic of a corrupt system designed by privileged adults and catering to boys who want to join their ranks. He realizes that the hat is unfashionable and occasionally is careful about who sees it, but he loves it anyway.

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Catcher in the Rye

the catcher in the rye baseball mitt

The prostitute questions Holden's age, just as others have done during the course of the novel, again proving that however old Holden thinks that he appears, he presents himself as a child to the adult characters around him. For Further Reading Holden makes several allusions to literary works in the novel. Although James Castle's brutally forced suicide took place at Elkton Hills, we get the idea that it could have happened at Pencey Prep just as easily. The red hat reminds him of his siblings who are the people he cares about the most. Even though he said he didn't like Pencey, he really did because he was sad to leave. Holden reminisces about Jane's smile, and admits that she is the only person whom he showed Allie's baseball mitt.

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SparkNotes: The Catcher in the Rye: Chapters 5

the catcher in the rye baseball mitt

Holden explains to Phoebe that all he wants to be is the catcher in the rye. He bought it for one dollar in New York on the Saturday morning when he lost the fencing equipment. Perhaps it's the only thing that makes him feel alive. In addition to Holden saying that he is depressed, we learn about his feelings through his behavior and the things that are important to him. Since Holden is very smart, we wonder why he asks such childish questions.

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Why is the baseball mitt important in Catcher in the Rye

the catcher in the rye baseball mitt

We also think that he is a person that doesn´t appreciates things, like his family, his friends and the opportunity of going to a boarding school. He asks several characters about it, ranging from cab drivers to his peers. She'd never met Allie or anything, because that was her first summer in Maine--before that, she went to Cape Cod-but I told her quite a lot about him. He treats Sally Hayes in the same manner as he does the other persons he meets or mentions in the course of the novel: outwardly friendly and cordial while masking a core of contempt for their values and idiosyncrasies. It's not antiwar, so much as a challenge to see the world from a different perspective. The fall from the cliff represents the fall from innocence. His behavior toward Maurice and Sunny indicates that he is at some level unconcerned that they will hurt him, and he even seems to take some perverse pleasure from the pain Maurice inflicts, as he uses this as a chance for role-playing as a movie gangster.

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