Role of women in victorian times. Domestic Violence in Victorian England :: Victorian Era 2019-02-07

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A Woman's Place in Victorian Society

role of women in victorian times

During the day wives that were their own house maids made clothes, cared for the sick, and grew and processed food that their family ate. Popular sports for girls included hockey, golf, cycling, tennis, fencing, and swimming. Visible minority groups, such as indigenous and labourers, were marginalised and suffered profound discrimination. Also having children gave women their rights. As the 19th century progressed dress became more and more lavish until clothing dripped with lace and beading as the new century dawned. Other jobs for the lower class women were barmaids, chambermaids, waitresses', and working in factories. The sheer number of Victorian servants and their duties makes it clear why expertise in logistical matters would benefit the mistress of the house.

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Women in the Victorian era

role of women in victorian times

Correspondingly, anyone in a family could be at risk of becoming a victim of domestic violence. By 1900 the railway, the typewriter, telephones, the post, the camera, the sewing machine, artificial rayon fibres and the bicycle became normal for many. Theodore Hoppen, The mid-Victorian generation, 1846—1886 2000 , pp 316ff. From the 1840s novelists started to put governesses into their fiction, usually as heroines but sometimes as villains. The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the country whose rich history covers many periods and eras. Indeed it is understandable to see why many women saw marriage as falling little short of slavery. Day to day living was nothing more than a lonely monotonous routine and very formal.

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Gender Ideology & Separate Spheres in the 19th Century

role of women in victorian times

The reasoning was that wives and mothers served as moral guides to children, so adultery committed by a woman was considered perverted and unnatural. Albeit, there were some nannies who were kind and caring and supplied the only love a child would experience. Legal standards for minimum housing conditions were a new concept during the Victorian era, and a working-class wife was responsible for keeping her family as clean, warm, and dry as possible in housing stock that was often literally rotting around them. Mothers were expected to be religious, as this supported the view that women were free of sexual passion and gratification. This legislation entitled the Criminal Law Amendment Act. Many working-class women worked as washerwomen, taking in laundry for a fee.

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Gender roles in the 19th century

role of women in victorian times

Victorian children would be made to go to work at a very young age. If the woman were married, she would often go out with four or five other couples. Laws designed to benefit men over women were hard to overlook. Women's Work: A Woman's Thoughts on Women's Rights. They wore corsets, high heeled shoes, long skirts, and other heavy clothing.

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Charles Dickens’ “Hard Times”, Essay Example

role of women in victorian times

One of the less grim work options for women of this class was to turn to prostitution. Physicians turned their attention to the use of corsets and determined that they caused several medical problems: compression of the thorax, restricted breathing, organ displacement, poor circulation, and prolapsed uterus. Unlike their lower class counterparts, upper class Victorian women more often than not had staff to help with the running of their home and the raising of their children, leaving them with plenty of time to enjoy the finer things in life. Women could be picked up off the streets, suspected of prostitution on little or no evidence, and subjected to an examination. Instead, the garments were designed beautifully so that women may resemble and compliment the décor of their lavish home, where they could look after their family and entertain, minus the strains and stresses of working and getting messy.

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Victorian Era Women's role and Social status

role of women in victorian times

During the Industrial Revolution, living conditions changed dramatically; as a result the economy to change from agricultural to industrial. Domestic violence towards wives was given increasing attention by social and legal reformers as the 19th century continued. For women, preserving modesty while riding was crucial. A lady changed through a wide range of clothing as occasion dictated. They would also carry with them pocket watches, walking sticks, and would often wear gloves.

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Gender roles in the 19th century

role of women in victorian times

Women's physical activity was a cause of concern at the highest levels of academic research during the Victorian era. While husbands participated in affairs with other women, wives endured infidelity, as they had no rights to divorce on these grounds and divorce was considered to be a social taboo. The men of the Victorian Era believed that a women's place was at home. In Wolverhampton, the law did not have much of an impact on women's mining employment, because they mainly worked above-ground at the coal mines, sorting coal, loading canal boats, and other surface tasks. This in itself was seen to be sufficient fulfillment for an upper class woman and the role of devoted wife and mother was highly idealized in Victorian Britain. This tendency was still observed in the Victorian period but then it was not that rejectable.

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Women in the Victorian era

role of women in victorian times

A woman in the Nobility class, or the highest class, was typically highly educated as well as very pampered. On the positive side, however, the 1857 Act denied the husband any right to the earnings of the wife he had deserted. Their mutual matrimonial consent therefore became a contract to give herself to her husband as he desired. These acts gave more protection to children from becoming prostitutes, made homosexuality a crime, and made the basis for prostitution to eventually become illegal. London: Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge.

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